Sunderbans, a tangled masterpiece of nature

Sunderbans, a tangled masterpiece of nature

The Sundarbans are the largest mangrove forest in the world. The forest, classified by the WWF as an ecoregion (code ecoregion: IM1406 [1]), extends over the delta of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers, in regions belonging to Bangladesh and the state of West Bengal, in India. The region is included in the Global 200 list with the name of Mangroves of the Sundarbans. [2]

It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1997, although the area belonging to Bangladesh and the one belonging to India are listed among the UNESCO World Heritage Sites under two different names (Sundarbans in the first case, Sundarbans National Park in the second , which has been on the list since 1987), although fundamentally they are simply two parts of the same forest.

The Sundarbans are intersected by a complex network of waterways subject to tides, mudflats and small islands of mangrove forests adapted to salt water, an excellent example of ongoing ecological processes. The area is famous for its huge variety of fauna: it hosts the largest terrestrial predator of the Asian continent, the Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), but there are also numerous species of cetaceans, deer, birds, crocodiles and snakes.

(Wikipedia)

sundarban india mangrove

Credits: NASA. This image was created by merging Landsat 7 satellite observations from November 24, 1999, and November 17 and 26, 2000.

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